just some old guy google glassing a taco aka the BEST GIF OF FRIDAY 

just some old guy google glassing a taco aka the BEST GIF OF FRIDAY 

Super valuable updated numbers on social engagement on the big guys. Also, a candid (if a bit snarky) look at where G+ stands today. Nice work from the crew at Critical Mass. Really thoughtful, strategic content. Can’t see a single component of the agency / brand / startup landscape that wouldn’t find significant value in getting to know these stats better. 

EASTER EGG: Google Translate fun-hack!
highly recommend this. // hilarious. won’t give away what it does, but you should do it!
DIRECTIONS »»> Go to Google Translate; Copy this text:
pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschkPick German as the ‘from’ language; Press the ‘Listen’-button

EASTER EGG: Google Translate fun-hack!

highly recommend this. // hilarious. won’t give away what it does, but you should do it!

DIRECTIONS »»> Go to Google Translate; Copy this text:

pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk

Pick German as the ‘from’ language; Press the ‘Listen’-button

Today’s Google Doodle is a based on a microchip in honor of the the 84th birth anniversary of Robert Noyce, the co-founder of Intel who is widely regarded as the “the Mayor of Silicon Valley” for his warm mentoring of others coming up in the field. He was also a total badass: went to Grinnell College in Iowa, was way into flying planes, extreme skiing and singing madrigals. Such a cool guy.   
He died on June 3, 1990 - my 6th birthday. For this reason, for the awesome social / digital work I got to be a part of on behalf of his brainchild mega-brand, and for my dear love of semi-conducting and processors and all they have spawned, I feel semi-connected (pun intended) to Robert Noyce. Clearly Google does too. :)

Today’s Google Doodle is a based on a microchip in honor of the the 84th birth anniversary of Robert Noyce, the co-founder of Intel who is widely regarded as the “the Mayor of Silicon Valley” for his warm mentoring of others coming up in the field. He was also a total badass: went to Grinnell College in Iowa, was way into flying planes, extreme skiing and singing madrigals. Such a cool guy.   

He died on June 3, 1990 - my 6th birthday. For this reason, for the awesome social / digital work I got to be a part of on behalf of his brainchild mega-brand, and for my dear love of semi-conducting and processors and all they have spawned, I feel semi-connected (pun intended) to Robert Noyce. Clearly Google does too. :)

I’ve been to so many big earth-shaking events from BigTechCo’s — today’s Google thing is making me yawn, while my eyes glaze over in boredom. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Here’s how products like this are conceived: Permanent link to this item in the archive.

1. We need to kill Facebook. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

2. What will we do. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

3. It can’t just be Facebook. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

4. No one will use that. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

5. It has to be better. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

6. It has to be something only we can do. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

7. Some place where we have the advantage. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

8. Something people have no choice but to use. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

So if you’re Microsoft in 1999, you bake it into Windows. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

If you’re Google in 2011, you bake it into search. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

All you do is make your core product heavier. The thing you wanted to kill doesn’t go anywhere. It hardly notices what you did. The users might care to the extent that they’re annoyed (or in the case of wordpress.com and their fear of being left out of the iPad, hugely annoyed). Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named elephant.jpgThe thing that makes Facebook great is that it incubated in the market with real users. It was made by real users. It was formed by actual use. One day at a time, one feature at a time, in public, every home run visible, and every mis-step. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Products like the one Google just announced are hatched at off-sites at resorts near Monterey or in the Sierra, and were designed to meet the needs of the corporation that created it. A huge scared angry corporation. What little is left of the spark that created it in the first place is now used to being Number One, and wants to feel that again. It’s being created to make that person feel better. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Eventually they will become an investment bank and a services company. The fate for all former high-flying techco’s. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Yawwwwwwwwwwn. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I love Google’s logo today celebrating summer solstice with art commissioned by Takashi Murakami! Below is a bit of background on the artist, who I’m shocked if you haven’t heard of by now!

Takashi Murakami was a Warhol for the modern age, blending high and  low art as he pleased and then selling it on the market as paintings and  sculptures but also key chains, watches, and T-shirts. Murakami drew  inspiration from Japanese art forms like anime and manga to create a  style called Superflat, which combines flat graphic imagery and colors  to produce highly patterned images.
Now, Murakami has been commissioned to create today’s Google Doodle of the summer solstice, the day in which

the Earth and Moon are most tilted toward the sun.

Also known as Midsummer, the solstice holds spiritual significance to  many neo-pagans, new agers, and curious travelers, some of whom travel all the way to Stonehenge to celebrate. Murakami’s doodle is called “First day of summer,” even  though the summer solstice is the longest day, and shows colorful  flowers smiling around anime-style gaping-mouthed heads.
See photos of the summer solstice here, and more of Murakami’s artwork below:
“DOB in the Strange Forest” by Takashi Murakami, a 1999 FRP Resin, fiber glass and acrylic installation work. 						(Kazuo Fukunaga - Via Bloomberg News) 
Takashi Murakami’s “Tan Tan Bo Puking - a.k.a. Gero Tan,” 2002, acrylic on canvas mounted on board.  						(Brooklyn Museum) 
Installation view of“Time Bokan – pink,” (2001) at Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, 2001 						(Norihiro Ueno - Brooklyn Museum) 
 “The Castle of Tin Tin” by Takashi Murakami, a 1998 acrylic on canvas work mounted on board. 						(Via Bloomberg News)

I love Google’s logo today celebrating summer solstice with art commissioned by Takashi Murakami! Below is a bit of background on the artist, who I’m shocked if you haven’t heard of by now!

Takashi Murakami was a Warhol for the modern age, blending high and low art as he pleased and then selling it on the market as paintings and sculptures but also key chains, watches, and T-shirts. Murakami drew inspiration from Japanese art forms like anime and manga to create a style called Superflat, which combines flat graphic imagery and colors to produce highly patterned images.

Now, Murakami has been commissioned to create today’s Google Doodle of the summer solstice, the day in which

the Earth and Moon are most tilted toward the sun.

Also known as Midsummer, the solstice holds spiritual significance to many neo-pagans, new agers, and curious travelers, some of whom travel all the way to Stonehenge to celebrate. Murakami’s doodle is called “First day of summer,” even though the summer solstice is the longest day, and shows colorful flowers smiling around anime-style gaping-mouthed heads.

See photos of the summer solstice here, and more of Murakami’s artwork below:


“DOB in the Strange Forest” by Takashi Murakami, a 1999 FRP Resin, fiber glass and acrylic installation work. (Kazuo Fukunaga - Via Bloomberg News)


Takashi Murakami’s “Tan Tan Bo Puking - a.k.a. Gero Tan,” 2002, acrylic on canvas mounted on board. (Brooklyn Museum)


Installation view of“Time Bokan – pink,” (2001) at Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, 2001 (Norihiro Ueno - Brooklyn Museum)



“The Castle of Tin Tin” by Takashi Murakami, a 1998 acrylic on canvas work mounted on board. (Via Bloomberg News)

While researching on children & user experience yesterday, I briefly fell down the Google Image Search wormhole, landing on the above image. Although it was completely useless for what I was looking for I put it aside & later, continued searching for stock images of children using touchscreen devices. The results of this accidental search were intriguing.
A survey of the stock image titans (Corbis, Shutterstock, Getty) around the keywords “touchscreen” and “child” or “kid” with the selection criteria that [1] all images must not be device specific (e.g. not showing an ipad) and [2] images must include a full face to the camera, yielded over half a dozen very similar images. These images all feature male children that appear to be Kindergarden age and have very similar blue/ green coloring and shimmery lighting and tech themed backgrounds. Uncanny!
There’s magical about these images: maybe it’s the combination of little kids knowing how to use the touchscreens as if it’s nothing? That emotion is amplified by the oddly alike radial gradient lighting in each image appearing as halos. The silly, trite numbers background graphics work against the quiet intrigue here, rendering a palpable juxtaposition.
Although I haven’t spent time truly generating a watertight and robust dip into this apparent coincidence of stock imagery, i feel like there’s something here. These images are haunting & evocative — capturing a generation of  never not knowing-technology.



awkward ones for laughs:


and one that’s rather Minority Report:

It’s as if these kids are seeing the world through technology, but it’s invisible to them— an invisible screen. Gazing into the intra-interfaces of babes (& beyond). 

While researching on children & user experience yesterday, I briefly fell down the Google Image Search wormhole, landing on the above image. Although it was completely useless for what I was looking for I put it aside & later, continued searching for stock images of children using touchscreen devices. The results of this accidental search were intriguing.

A survey of the stock image titans (Corbis, Shutterstock, Getty) around the keywords “touchscreen” and “child” or “kid” with the selection criteria that [1] all images must not be device specific (e.g. not showing an ipad) and [2] images must include a full face to the camera, yielded over half a dozen very similar images. These images all feature male children that appear to be Kindergarden age and have very similar blue/ green coloring and shimmery lighting and tech themed backgrounds. Uncanny!

There’s magical about these images: maybe it’s the combination of little kids knowing how to use the touchscreens as if it’s nothing? That emotion is amplified by the oddly alike radial gradient lighting in each image appearing as halos. The silly, trite numbers background graphics work against the quiet intrigue here, rendering a palpable juxtaposition.

Although I haven’t spent time truly generating a watertight and robust dip into this apparent coincidence of stock imagery, i feel like there’s something here. These images are haunting & evocative — capturing a generation of never not knowing-technology.

awkward ones for laughs:

and one that’s rather Minority Report:

It’s as if these kids are seeing the world through technology, but it’s invisible to them— an invisible screen. Gazing into the intra-interfaces of babes (& beyond). 

as silly as this notion of Tumblr University may seem, the notion of self-curated education is very real. And people often do learn far more from exploring the universe of shared and shareable ideas and images than they do in a classroom. It speaks as a plea to modernize traditional means of curriculum so that they are infused with student-generated topics and content.
does this inspire you? do you learn from tumblr or twitter or facebook in a way you didn’t learn from college? what will the future of education hold?


The new Explore  page was born due to the rather eclectic nature of many a Tumblr —  unless you’re a fashion blogger or something of the like, chances are  your content is all over the map, which can make it hard to be seen in  the Tumblr Directory.
Explore makes the Tumblr experience more  democratic, allowing any tagged post to appear on the page and therefore  get eyeballs, according to a blog  post. There’s also the Tumblr Wire at the top of the page —  reminiscent of “Top Tweets” or trending topics — which displays top  tags. You also can track tags to get notifications on your Dashboard.

MORE INFO ON TUMBLR EXPLORE! 
how might the Tumblr update (above news and screenshot) change things for education — besides facilitating faster, quicker, more funneled access to relevant content?

as silly as this notion of Tumblr University may seem, the notion of self-curated education is very real. And people often do learn far more from exploring the universe of shared and shareable ideas and images than they do in a classroom. It speaks as a plea to modernize traditional means of curriculum so that they are infused with student-generated topics and content.

does this inspire you? do you learn from tumblr or twitter or facebook in a way you didn’t learn from college? what will the future of education hold?

The new Explore page was born due to the rather eclectic nature of many a Tumblr — unless you’re a fashion blogger or something of the like, chances are your content is all over the map, which can make it hard to be seen in the Tumblr Directory.

Explore makes the Tumblr experience more democratic, allowing any tagged post to appear on the page and therefore get eyeballs, according to a blog post. There’s also the Tumblr Wire at the top of the page — reminiscent of “Top Tweets” or trending topics — which displays top tags. You also can track tags to get notifications on your Dashboard.

MORE INFO ON TUMBLR EXPLORE!

how might the Tumblr update (above news and screenshot) change things for education — besides facilitating faster, quicker, more funneled access to relevant content?



 
"Facebook, which has more than 600 million users and was valued at $50 billion in a recent funding round, is grabbing online-advertising from Yahoo, Myspace and others. The social network is a potential rival in electronic payments to eBay Inc.’s PayPal, while partnerships Facebook is cementing with smartphone makers set the stage for competition with Apple Inc. and Google in mobile services…Facebook executives aren’t shy about their aspirations. “We think every industry is going to be rebuilt around social engagement,” Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said.”

fred-wilson:



Facebook’s Growing Web of Frenemies - WSJ.com

 

"Facebook, which has more than 600 million users and was valued at $50 billion in a recent funding round, is grabbing online-advertising from Yahoo, Myspace and others. The social network is a potential rival in electronic payments to eBay Inc.’s PayPal, while partnerships Facebook is cementing with smartphone makers set the stage for competition with Apple Inc. and Google in mobile services…Facebook executives aren’t shy about their aspirations. “We think every industry is going to be rebuilt around social engagement,” Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said.”

fred-wilson:

Facebook’s Growing Web of Frenemies - WSJ.com

On the pathos of insipid Hollywood distribution models & Google vs Netflix
Why hasn’t Hollywood found a way to create a simple licensing model that works for everyone that wants in? It’s their own fault that video piracy is rapidly overtaking music piracy as they continue to banish any who attempt to access their (very replaceable) content. That said, it’s intriguing how everyone seems to be attacking Google for their seeming failure at the slick Hollyweird game vs. say, Netflix, a quiet giant in the on-demand space.



Summary:

Google TV is on pause because it lacks the content distribution relationships that Netflix has created. The conventional way to forge these relationships is old school— IRL shmoozing. The implication here is that Google suffers in that capacity, so they’ll keep delaying until some partnerships are established that ensure Goog can pipe fresh content out there.

Insights:

The 100 year old film business still clinging to an ancient distribution model despite all signs pointing to the fact that the majority of people would be fine with just paying for a download of the movie straight to their TV, on-demand style. An insightful commenter put it:
The revolution is coming the question is will Hollywood survive it or will the new generation of movie makers learn to bypass the middle men like what’s happening in the music industry.
It’s Greek tragedy level pathos…all this greed and self-importance and blindness. Even so, Google has never been a content engine. Contextual serving of search or ads is radically different than having to stock a pipeline up with rich, engaging features. Still, with so many forecasts of Netflix’s impending contract re-negotiation fallout, I’m staying glued to the hinternetz to track this story. Any predictions?
yes, i’ll have the awesomest app for iPad (or for 2010 for that matter) with some updatey awesomesauce please? 

From its launch a number of folks screamed loudly that they wanted Flipboard to do the same thing with RSS feeds. Well this new update brings that functionality as well as new ways to share information that you discover. It ties into your Google Reader account and brings RSS feeds you follow there. Most of the functionality (sharing, starring for later reading, etc.. is there.) 

In addition, support is now included for Flickr and other venues too. also it now loads full stories and pulls you through to the destination when you click for more. 
The forecast: this could pose major threat for Seesmic, Tweetdeck, Google Reader and the like — with the exception that Flipboard 2.0 still lacks multiple twitter account support (why?!!?!) 
The lesson here: Listening to your enthusiasts works! Let that be a lesson to all ye bossy app dev hauses not really doing what the people want. Flipboard could have (and still can for that matter) keep going in a variety of directions, but i think this shows a lot of wisdom and a lot of restraint. 
Full feature enhancement by my techcrush MG @ Techcrunch over here.
well played!

yes, i’ll have the awesomest app for iPad (or for 2010 for that matter) with some updatey awesomesauce please? 

From its launch a number of folks screamed loudly that they wanted Flipboard to do the same thing with RSS feeds. Well this new update brings that functionality as well as new ways to share information that you discover. It ties into your Google Reader account and brings RSS feeds you follow there. Most of the functionality (sharing, starring for later reading, etc.. is there.) 

In addition, support is now included for Flickr and other venues too. also it now loads full stories and pulls you through to the destination when you click for more.

The forecast: this could pose major threat for Seesmic, Tweetdeck, Google Reader and the like — with the exception that Flipboard 2.0 still lacks multiple twitter account support (why?!!?!)

The lesson here: Listening to your enthusiasts works! Let that be a lesson to all ye bossy app dev hauses not really doing what the people want. Flipboard could have (and still can for that matter) keep going in a variety of directions, but i think this shows a lot of wisdom and a lot of restraint. 

Full feature enhancement by my techcrush MG @ Techcrunch over here.

well played!

You don’t work on great technology at a startup. Startups, by and large, aren’t about technology — at least, not the Web 2.0 startups like Facebook, Foursquare, Twitter, Groupon, etc. They are about business model discovery. So if you are fundamentally a technologist at heart, whose heart sings when you’re making a better file system, or fixing a kernel bug, you’re not going to be happy at a startup. At least, not if the startup is run competently. If you have the heart of an entrepreneur, and you are willing to roll the dice (since 9 out of 10 startups go belly up; those are the ones that failed to find a viable business model), then sure, go for a startup. And understand that your job will be to make something that works well at a small scale, quick, dirty, and cheap. If that means using some proprietary software, then that’s what you should do. Hopefully you’ll get lucky and win the IPO lottery.

But if your primary interest is to doing great engineering work, then you want go to company that has a proven business model.

Mobile Under Water!! New Google Earth for Android lets users tour New Kelp City, Mermalair

Finally Android users have something new and fun to do: go for a dive. With the release of Google Earth for Android 1.1 (available to Android 2.1 and above devices), you can now zoom in below the surface of the waves and explore the majestic wonder of undersea trenches.

Tim Stevens @ Engadget

scan the QR code below to download!


In an extremely important court decision, a New York federal judge ruled in favor of Google’s YouTube in a defense against Viacom’s $1 billion copyright infringement lawsuit on Wednesday. Viacom claimed that YouTube knowingly ignored the tens of thousands of videos uploaded to the site that included copyrighted materials owned by the music and entertainment company.
………………………………………………………. …

I believe that the industry’s survival also depends greatly on its ability to adapt to audience behaviors and desires. We now live in a world where people demand access to content they want, instantly, and enjoy paying homage in active ways through mash-ups, compilations, spoofs and other incorporations and interpretations of the copyrighted material that they love. Smart companies, in my opinion, have accepted this and are finding ways to leverage this enthusiasm for their content into sales, PR, and otherwise positive brand affinity. It’s worth noting that YouTube has created Video Identification, a filtering technology that helps to identify copyrighted material when it is uploaded to the site. Also, YouTube itself has become a powerful platform in increasing entertainment industry revenues, allowing record labels to sell song downloads directly from videos on their platform…..